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The Authoritative HD DVD FAQ: II. Physical, Logical, and Application Specifications
Posted Jul 19, 2006 Print Version     Page 1of 1
  

II. Physical, Logical, and Application Specifications
     a. What specifications govern HD DVD discs?
     b. What HD DVD formats are available?
     c. What file systems are used on HD DVD discs?
     d. What are HD DVD-ROM/DVD-ROM Combo and Twin Discs?
     e. Is there an HD DVD-ROM version being developed specially for the Chinese market?
     f. What is the UDO-DMD professional mastering format?
     g. What is a Total Hi Def disc?
     h. What is a 3x-speed DVD-ROM disc?
     i. What are Performance Level 1 and 2 HD DVD players?
     j. What video codecs does the HD DVD-Video format support?
     k. What audio codecs does the HD DVD-Video format support?
     l. What audio codecs must all HD DVD players decode?
     m. How do HD DVD, BD and DVD video formats and player requirements compare?

What specifications govern HD DVD discs?
All HD DVD disc formats are governed by a variety of specifications (books) defining their mechanical properties, optical signal characteristics, physical arrangement, writing methods and testing conditions as well as file systems and applications (see chart).

Specifications for HD DVD physical formats (HD DVD-ROM, C-HD DVD-ROM, HD DVD-R, HD DVD-R DL, HD DVD-RW, HD DVD-RW DL and HD DVD-RAM) and applications (HD DVD-Video, HD DVD-VR) were established and are continually updated by the DVD Forum (originally DVD Consortium), an alliance of manufacturers founded in 1995 by Hitachi, Matsushita Electric, Mitsubishi Electric, Pioneer, Philips Electronics, Sony, Thomson, Time Warner, Toshiba and JVC.

HD DVD Specification Books
Initial Publication Dates

Format

Physical Format Specification

File System
Specification

Application Format
Specification

HD DVD-ROM

v. 1.0 (June 2004)
Optional: Triple Layer Twin r. 1.0 (Sept. 2007)

v. 1.0 (Aug. 2005)

NA

HD DVD-ROM (51G)

v. 2.0 (Dec. 2007)

NA

NA

HD DVD-R

v. 1.0 (Feb. 2005)
Optional: 1x-speed r. 1.0 (Feb. 2005)
Optional: 2x speed r. 2.0 (Feb. 2007)
Optional: Case r. 1.0 (Feb. 2005)
Optional: Holder for 8 cm disc r. 1.0 (Sept. 2006)

v. 1.0 (Aug. 2005)

NA

HD DVD-R DL

v. 2.0 (Dec. 2005)
Optional: 1x-speed r. 1.0 (Dec. 2005)
Optional: Case r. 1.0 (Dec. 2005)
Optional: Holder for 8 cm disc r. 1.0 (Sept. 2006)

v. 2.0 (May 2006)

NA

HD DVD-RW

v. 1.0 (May 2006)
Optional: 1x-speed r. 1.0 (May 2006)
Optional: 2x-speed r. 2.0 (Feb. 2007)
Optional: Case r. 1.0 (May 2006)
Optional: Holder for 8 cm disc r. 1.0 (Sept. 2006)

v. 1.0 (Apr. 2007)

NA

HD DVD-RW DL

v. 2.0 (May 2006)
Optional: 1x-speed r. 1.0 (May 2006)
Optional: Case r. 1.0 (May 2006)
Optional: Holder for 8 cm disc r. 1.0 (Sept. 2006)

v. 2.0 (Apr. 2007)

NA

HD DVD-RAM

v. 1.0 (Sept. 2004)
Optional: 1x-speed r. 1.0 (Sept. 2004)
Optional: Case r. 1.0 (Feb. 2005)
Optional: Holder for 8 cm disc r. 1.0 (Sept. 2006)

v. 1.0 (Aug. 2005)

NA

HD DVD-Video

NA

NA

v. 1.0 (Aug. 2005)
Reference: MLP v. 1.0 (Aug. 2005)
Reference: DTS-HD v. 1.0 (Aug. 2005)

HD DVD-VR

NA

NA

v. 1.0 (Oct. 2005)

C-HD DVD-ROM

v. 10.0 (Feb. 2007)

r. 1.0 (Dec. 2007)

r. 1.0 (Oct. 2007)

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What HD DVD formats are available?
HD DVD comes in prerecorded (HD DVD-ROM), recordable (HD DVD-R), re-recordable (HD DVD-RW) and rewritable (HD DVD-RAM) configurations (see chart).

Similar to familiar CD and DVD-ROM, HD DVD-ROM has information permanently molded (pressed) into it at the factory and is typically used to distribute commercial content (movies, games, software, etc.). Initial HD DVD-ROM physical format specifications (version 1.0) were released in 2004 to define 12 cm single (SL) and dual-layer (DL) discs storing 15 GB per layer in single (SS) and double-sided (DS) configurations. A 4.7 GB per layer 8 cm disc (version 1.1), along with a Twin type combining separate HD DVD-ROM and DVD-ROM layers on a single disc side (version 1.2), were defined in 2005 while a three-layer (TL) Twin consisting of one DVD-ROM and two HD DVD-ROM layers (optional 1.0) was specified in 2007. Expected to appear in Dec. 2007 are specifications for a single-sided (SS) three-layer (TL) HD DVD-ROM storing 17 GB per layer (51 GB). The first generation of discs, drives and players began appearing in May 2006.

Akin to CD-R and DVD±R, HD DVD-R is the recordable format used for data storage as well as audio/video recording. It is write-once employing an organic dye (or inorganic material) recording layer to which information is written by means of a laser. With the same capacity and layout as HD DVD-ROM, 12 cm HD DVD-R SL (version 1.0) and DL (version 2.0) specifications were first released in 2005 and 8 cm SL (version 1.1) and DL (version 2.1) in 2006.

Resembling CD-RW and DVD±RW, HD DVD-RW is a rewritable (a.k.a. re-recordable) format incorporating a recording layer composed of a phase-change alloy that can be rewritten multiple times. With capacity equal to HD DVD-R, 12 cm HD DVD-RW SL (version 1.0) and DL (version 2.0) and 8 cm SL (version 1.1) and DL (version 2.1) specifications were released in 2006.

Based on DVD-RAM, HD DVD-RAM also employs a phase-change recording layer that can be rewritten but incorporates a zoned layout, hard sectors, a double spiral track structure (land and groove), hardware-based defect management and higher 20 GB SL (12 cm) capacity. These features distinguish HD DVD-RAM from the prerecorded HD DVD-ROM format that acts as the foundation for all other HD DVD discs. Known briefly as HD DVD-ARW and then HD DVD-RW during its development, 12 cm HD DVD-RAM (version 1.0) specifications were first released in 2004 and 8 cm (version 1.1) in 2006. Initial products have yet to be announced.

HD DVD Physical Format Comparison

Features

HD DVD-ROM

HD DVD-R

HD DVD-RW

HD DVD-RAM

Type of disc

Prerecorded

Write-once

Rewritable (re-recordable)

Rewritable

Data layer type

Molded

Dye, organic

Phase-change

Phase-change

Rewrite cycles

NA

NA

TBA

TBA

Disc diameter

12 cm, 8 cm

12 cm, 8 cm

12 cm, 8 cm

12 cm, 8 cm

Data sides

1 or 2

1 or 2

1 or 2

1 or 2

Data layers

1 or 2

1 or 2

1 or 2

1

Capacity per layer

15GB (12 cm),
4.7GB (8 cm)

15 GB (12 cm),
4.7 GB (8 cm)

15 GB (12 cm),
4.7 GB (8 cm)

20 GB (12 cm),
6.1 GB (8 cm)

Cartridge

No

Optional

Optional

Optional

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What file systems are used on HD DVD discs?
While it is possible for HD DVD discs to employ any number of file systems, the Universal Disc Format (UDF) version 2.5 developed by the Optical Storage Technology Association (OSTA) is specified for most applications.

HD DVD-Video and HD DVD-VR Disc File Systems
(as of Jan. 2008)

Disc Type

UDF Version

Volume Structure

HD DVD-ROM

2.5

Read-only partition

HD DVD-R

2.5

Read-only partition, VAT

HD DVD-R DL

2.5

Read-only partition, VAT

HD DVD-RAM

2.5

Overwritable partition

HD DVD-RW

2.5

Read-only partition, sparable partition

HD DVD-RW DL

2.5

Read-only partition, sparable partition

3x DVD-ROM

2.5

Read-only partition

DVD-R (G)

2.5

Read-only partition, VAT

DVD-R DL

2.5

Read-only partition, VAT

DVD-RW

2.0

Sparable partition

DVD-RW DL

2.0

Sparable partition

DVD-RAM

2.0

Overwritable partition

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What are HD DVD-ROM/DVD-ROM Combo and Twin discs?
HD DVD Combo and Twin discs bring together prerecorded HD DVD-ROM and DVD-ROM physical formats in a single disc. These combination discs are possible because both formats share many physical characteristics (radius, thickness, spiral and rotational directions, etc.) but with important differences (data read using different wavelength lasers, etc.).

A Combo is double-sided (DS) disc containing one or two pre-recorded HD DVD-ROM layers (15 GB or 30 GB) on its top side and one or two traditional DVD-ROM layers (4.7 GB or 8.5 GB) on its flip side.

A Twin is a pairing of one HD DVD-ROM layer (15 GB) with a DVD-ROM (4.7GB) layer both on the same side (single-sided) and a three-layer (TL) Twin joins two HD DVD-ROM layers (30GB) and one DVD-ROM layer (4.7GB).

Although Twin discs are designed to play in both HD DVD and DVD devices, manufacturers caution that they may not be compatible with some existing DVD equipment (because of close proximity of data layers creating light interference and focus difficulties, layer identification issues, etc.). Given such unpredictability and insufficient capacity for most commercial movies (typical titles would require two DVD and two HD DVD layers), Twin may remain a seldom-used curiosity.

As of Jan. 2008, Warner Home Video, Universal Studios Entertainment, Paramount, DVD International and Concert Hot Spot (United States) have released or announced that they will offer selected movies on Combo discs while several dual-layer Twin titles are available from Pony Canyon (Japan), Shogakukan (Japan) and Bandai Visual (Japan, United States).

Numerically speaking, as of Jan. 29, 2007, of the 233 movies listed by the HDDVDPRG as being released in the U.S. and Japan eight (3.4%) are available in Twin format, 26 in Combo (11.2%) and the rest in conventional HD DVD-ROM. Of the 456 listed as current and planned for future release, nine (2.0%) are in Twin and 40 (8.8%) are in Combo.

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

Is there an HD DVD-ROM version being developed specially for the Chinese market?
The DVD Forum, in cooperation with a Chinese government research organization called the Optical Memory National Engineering Research Center (OMNERC), has developed physical format specifications for a HD DVD-ROM (pre-recorded) version to be marketed in China.

First proposed in May 2005 by OMNERC, the China Blue High-Definition Disc (CBHD) or China HD DVD-ROM (C-HD DVD-ROM) format (formerly called China High Definition DVD (CH-DVD) and HD DVD-ROM for China Only) employs a Four-to-Six Modulation (FSM) encoding system, instead of HD DVD's standard Eight-to-Twelve Modulation (ETM), and thus is incompatible with players and drives sold in the rest of the world. Other differences include CBHD’s use of a simplified navigation system, the Audio Video Standard (AVS) and Digital Round Audio (DRA) codecs as well as the China Digital Rights Management System (CDRM).

In Sept. 2007, OMNERC established the China High Definition DVD Industry Association (CHDA) to promote the CBHD format.

OMNERC CBHD Industry Projections
(as of Nov. 2007)

Year

Hardware Unit Sales

Software Titles

Industry Output Value

2008

500,000

200

4B RMB ($550M USD)

2009

5 million

800

40B RMB ($5.5B USD)

2010

10 million

1,600

80B RMB ($11B USD)

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What is the UDO-DMD professional mastering format?
Ultra Density Optical-Digital Master Disc (UDO-DMD) is a recently announced professional optical storage system designed to archive as well as physically transport newly minted HD DVD movies from their creating authoring studios to disc mastering and replication facilities for commercial production. Introduced by Verbatim/MKM, Plasmon and Memory-Tech and scheduled for rollout in early 2007, UDO-DMD is promoted as an alternative to magnetic tapes and hard disk drives.

UDO-DMD is a slightly modified version of Plasmon's existing Ultra Density Optical (UDO) format that has been available since 2003. Thus, it employs a blue laser (405 mw) to read and write recordable and rewritable discs i.e. 130 mm, phase change, single-layer/double-sided housed in sealed cartridges, storing roughly 15 GB per side for a total of 30 GB.

To accommodate the full contents of a dual-layer HD DVD-ROM and its related descriptor files, this first generation of UDO-DMD (known as DMD30) offers marginally greater capacity than its conventional UDO counterpart. Planned for release mid-2007 is its second generation (DMD60) that will be capable of storing a little over 60 GB (30.2 GB per side).

To help guard against theft, tampering or other unauthorized user access, a DMD disc cannot be written or read by a standard UDO drive. Additional protection comes by way of an electronic serial number embedded in each disc along with optional user-specified key locks.

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What is a Total Hi Def disc?
Total Hi Def (THD) brings together prerecorded HD DVD-ROM and Blu-ray Disc (BD-ROM) physical formats in a single disc. THD is double-sided (DS) containing one or two prerecorded HD DVD-ROM layers (15 GB or 30 GB) on its top side and one or two BD-ROM layers (25 GB or 50 GB) on its flip side. Warner Bros. (Warner Home Video, HBO Video, New Line Home Entertainment) originally planned to offer THD discs in the second half of 2007 but has since put those plans on hold indefinitely.

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What is a 3x-speed DVD-ROM disc?
A 3x-speed DVD-ROM is a prerecorded DVD-ROM disc designed for playback in HD DVD players that contains audio and video authored in the same format employed in commercial HD DVD-ROM movies (HD DVD-Video).

Physically, a 3x-speed DVD-ROM is simply a 12 cm DVD-ROM disc with standard 4.7 GB (single-layer) or 8.5 GB (dual-layer) capacities but is fabricated to somewhat tighter specification for dynamic imbalance. It is also spun at three times the normal speed of a DVD resulting in a proportionally higher data transfer rate (33.24 Mbps vs. 11.08 Mbps).

In terms of its logical and application formats, 3x-speed DVD-ROM employs the same file system (UDF 2.5), content protection (AACS) and structure (HD DVD-Video) used by commercial HD DVD movies. As such 3x-speed DVD-ROM offers identical features to HD DVD-ROM although there are some restrictions arising from its somewhat lower performance (33.24 Mbps vs. 36.55 Mbps).

3x-speed DVD-ROM is intended to leverage existing DVD manufacturing infrastructure in order to potentially provide a lower cost vehicle for publishing budget and lesser quality high definition titles, short studio and independent movies and presentations, television shows, music albums as well as bonus content. However, given its lower capacity and the expectation of rapidly declining HD DVD-ROM production costs, 3x-speed DVD-ROM (like its Blu-ray Disc BD9 counterpart) is not widely promoted and may remain a seldom-used curiosity. As of Mar. 2007, no 3x-speed DVD-ROM titles have yet been announced.

3x-speed DVD-ROM and BD9 Format Comparison

Features

3x-speed DVD-ROM

BD9

Type of disc

DVD-ROM (prerecorded)

DVD-ROM (prerecorded)

Wavelength (nm)

650 (red)

650 (red)

Disc capacity

4.7 GB (SL), 8.5 GB (DL)

4.7 GB (SL), 8.5 GB (DL)

Disc diameter

12 cm

12 cm

Data layers

1 or 2

1 or 2

Dynamic unbalance/imbalance (g.mm)

≤ 4.4

≤ 4.4

Channel bit rate (Mbps)

78.46875

78.46875

User data rate (Mbps)

33.24

33.24

Transport stream max. data rate (Mbps)

30.24

28

Reference velocity (m/s)

10.47 (SL), 11.52 (DL)

10.47 (SL), 11.52 (DL)

File system

UDF 2.5

UDF 2.5

Application formats

HD DVD-Video

BD-ROM AV (HDMV, BD-J)

Content protection

AACS

AACS, BD+, ROM Mark

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What are Performance Level 1 and 2 HD DVD players?
Features obviously vary among models and versions from different manufacturers but there are two basic types of HD DVD-Video consumer electronics (CE) players and computer playback software (Performance Level 1 and Performance Level 2).

In specific terms, HD DVD-Video guidelines define separate Performance Level 1 (PL1) and Performance Level 2 (PL2) requirements, each outlining various functions and minimums that must be supported and met in their respective conforming players and software. These include specifications for persistent storage, sub video decoding, audio/video output, graphic/text drawing, rendering, conversion and others (see chart).

Also under consideration is an additional Performance Level 3 (PL3) player type that specifies increased graphic, text rendering and other processing speed. A further Performance Level 0 (PL0) specification intended for portable, automotive, audio and inexpensive devices was also debated but eventually abandoned by the DVD Forum.

HD DVD Video Player Performance Levels
(abridged)

Functions

Performance Level 1 (PL1)

Performance Level 2 (PL2)

Persistent storage capacity (minimum)

128 MB

128 MB

Persistent storage data throughput (minimum)

10 Mbps

10 Mbps

Connection to additional persistent storage

optional

mandatory

5.1 ch. audio output for all mandatory codecs

optional

mandatory

Trusted content test mode

mandatory

mandatory

Sub video decoder
standard video (mandatory)

MPEG-2 (3 Mbps average, 6 Mbps peak)
MPEG-4 AVC/VC-1 (2 Mbps average, 4 Mbps peak)

MPEG-2 (3 Mbps average, 6 Mbps peak)
MPEG-4 AVC/VC-1 (2 Mbps average, 4 Mbps peak)

Sub video decoder
enhanced video (optional)

All codecs (8 Mbps average, 15 Mbps peak)

All codecs (8 Mbps average, 15 Mbps peak)

24p video output (optional)

optional compose all planes at 24p domain and output composed signal at 24p

mandatory compose all planes at 24p domain and output composed signal at 24p

HD DVD Video Player Performance Level Compliance
(as of Dec. 2007)

Brand/Manufacturer

Model

Performance Level

Persistent Storage Capacity

Sub Video Decoder

Integra

DHS-8.8

Level 1

128 MB

SD

Microsoft

Xbox 360 w/ HD DVD player

Level 1

192 MB

SD

Onkyo

DV-HD805

Level 1

128 MB

SD

RCA

HDV5000

Level 1

128 MB

SD

Samsung

BD-UP5000

Level 1

128 MB

SD

Toshiba

HD-A1

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-XA1

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-A2

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-XA2

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-A20

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-A3

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-A30

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

Toshiba

HD-A35

Level 1

128 MB*

SD

* Currently not expandable. A spokesperson for Toshiba indicates that it may be possible in the future
to connect additional persistent storage if enabled by a firmware update.

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What video codecs does the HD DVD-Video format support?
Even a single hour of high definition video can occupy hundreds of gigabytes of space. To allow a serviceable amount of material to fit on a single HD DVD-Video disc, video is compressed using one of three codecs: MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC or VC-1. Though the choice of scheme is made while encoding the source material, before or while authoring the disc, every HD DVD-Video playback device is designed to decode all three codecs (see chart).

HD DVD-Video Format Video Streams

 

MPEG-2

MPEG-4 AVC/H.264

VC-1

Standard

ISO/IEC 13818-2,
ITU-T Rec. H.262

ISO/IEC 14496-10,
ITU-T Rec. H.264

SMPTE 421M

Profile and Level

MP@HL, MP@ML, SP@ML

HP@L4.1, HP@L3.2

AP@L3, AP@L2

Film Grain Technology (FGT)

NA

Yes (SMPTE RDD 5-2006)

NA

Main Video Stream Max. Data Rate (Mbps)

29.40 (HD), 15.0 (SD)

29.40 (HD), 15.0 (SD)

29.40 (HD), 15.0 (SD)

Sub Video Stream Max. Data Rate (Mbps)

3 CBR or 6 VBR (SD),
8 CBR or 15 VBR (HD)

2 CBR or 4 VBR (SD),
8 CBR or 15 VBR (HD)

2 CBR or 4 VBR (SD),
8 CBR or 15 VBR (HD)

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What audio codecs does the HD DVD-Video format support?
HD DVD-Video (HD DVD-V) main, sub and effect audio streams support the following codecs:

Main Audio: Linear Pulse Code Modulation (LPCM), Dolby Digital (DD/AC-3), Dolby Digital Plus (DD+/E-AC-3), Dolby TrueHD, MPEG-1 Layer II, MPEG-2 BC Layer II and DTS-HD which can include in its bitstream DTS Core, DTS-96/24, DTS-ES, DTS-HD High Resolution Audio (DTS-HD HR) and DTS-HD Master Audio (DTS-HD MA).

Sub Audio: Dolby Digital Plus, DTS Digital Surround (DTS), DTS Express (formerly DTS-HD LBR), MPEG-4 AAC, MPEG-4 HE-AAC v2, MPEG-1 Layer III (MP3) and WMA Pro.

HD DVD-Video Format Sub Audio Stream

 

DTS

DTS Express

Max. Bit Rate (Mbps)

0.510

0.192

No. Channels

1 or 2

1 or 2

Bits/sample

16, 24

16, 24

Sampling Frequency (kHz)

48

12, 24, 48

Effect Audio: LPCM.

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

What audio codecs must all HD DVD players decode?
All HD DVD-Video players and playback software must decode the following with the other codecs available as options:

Main Audio: LPCM, Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, MLP Lossless, DTS-HD (DTS Core only), MPEG-1 Layer II, MPEG-2 BC Layer II (w/o extensions) in either two (Performance Level 1) or 5.1 (Performance Level 2) channels.

Sub Audio: Dolby Digital Plus, DTS Digital Surround and DTS Express.

Effect Audio: LPCM.

HD DVD-Video Player Mandatory Audio Decoding

Codec

 

Performance
Level 1 (PL1)

Performance
Level 1 (PL1)

Performance
Level 2 (PL2)

Performance
Level 2 (PL2)

 

 

Main Audio

Sub Audio

Main Audio

Sub Audio

LPCM

 

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

Dolby Digital

 

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

Dolby Digital Plus

 

2 channels

2 channels

5.1 channels

2 channels

Dolby TrueHD

 

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

MLP Lossless

 

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

MPEG-1 Layer II

 

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

MPEG-2 BC Layer II

 

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

DTS-HD

DTS Core

2 channels

NA

5.1 channels

NA

 

DTS-96/24

option

NA

option

NA

 

DTS-ES

option

NA

option

NA

 

DTS-HD HR

option

NA

option

NA

 

DTS-HD MA

option

NA

option

NA

 

DTS Express

NA

2 channels

NA

2 channels

DTS

 

NA

2 channels

NA

2 channels

AAC

 

NA

option

NA

option

HE-AAC v2

 

NA

option

NA

option

MP3

 

NA

option

NA

option

WMA Pro

 

NA

option

NA

option

[Top of page] [HD DVD FAQ home][EMedialive home]

How do HD DVD, BD and DVD video formats and player requirements compare?

HD DVD/BD/DVD
Video Format and Player Comparison

 

HD DVD-Video
(HD DVD-V)

BD-ROM AV
(HDMV, BD-J)

DVD-Video
(DVD-V)

 

 

 

 

Disc Rotational Speed

1x reference velocity

1.5x reference velocity

1x reference velocity

User Data Rate (Mbps)

36.55

53.9475

11.08

All Streams
Max. Data Rate (Mbps)

30.24

48

10.08

Primary/Main Video Stream
Max. Data Rate (Mbps)

29.4 (HD), 15.0 (SD)

40

9.8 (MPEG-2), 1.856 (MPEG-1)

Secondary/Sub Video Stream
Max. Data Rate (Mbps)

3 CBR/6 VBR MPEG-2, 2 CBR/4 VBR MPEG-4 AVC or VC-1 (SD)

8 CBR/15 VBR MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC or VC-1 (HD)

40 (HD), 8 (SD)

NA

Multiplexing System

MPEG-2 PS

MPEG-2 TS

MPEG-2 PS

Primary/Main Video Stream

MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC, VC-1

MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC, VC-1

MPEG-1, MPEG-2

Secondary/Sub Video Stream

MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC, VC-1

MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC, VC-1

NA

Video Codec Profile and Level

MPEG-2 (MP@HL, MP@ML, SP@ML),
MPEG-4 AVC (HP@L4.1, HP@L3.2),
VC-1 (AP@L3, AP@L2)

MPEG-2 (MP@HL, MP@ML),
MPEG-4 AVC (HP@L4.1, MP@L4.1), VC-1 (AP@L3)

MPEG-1,
MPEG-2 (subset MP@ML, SP@ML)

Film Grain Technology (FGT)

MPEG-4 AVC

NA

NA

Primary/Main Audio Stream

LPCM, Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, MPEG-1 Layer II, MPEG-2 BC Layer II, DTS-HD**

up to 18.432 Mbps, up to 8 channels, up to 24 bit, up to 192 kHz (codec dependent)

LPCM, Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby Lossless*, DTS, DTS-HD**

up to 27.648 Mbps, up to 8 channels, up to 24 bit, up to 192 kHz (codec dependent)

LPCM, MPEG-1 Layer II, MPEG-2 BC Layer II, Dolby Digital, DTS, SDDS

up to 6.144 Mbps, up to 8 channels, up to 24 bit, up to 96 kHz (codec dependent)

Secondary/Sub Audio Stream

Dolby Digital Plus, DTS, DTS Express,
AAC, HE-AAC v2, MP3, WMA Pro

Dolby Digital Plus, DTS Express

NA

Interactive/Effect Audio Stream

LPCM

LPCM

NA

Audio Mixing

Main Audio, Sub Audio, Effect Audio

Primary Audio, Secondary Audio, Interactive Audio

NA

Presentation Planes/Overlays

Main Video, Sub Video, Sub Picture, Graphics, Cursor

Primary Video, Secondary Video, Presentation Graphics, Interactive Graphics, BD-J Background

Video, Subpicture

Primary/Main Video Plane Resolution

up to 1920 x 1080

up to 1920 x 1080

up to 720 x 480 (MPEG-2),
352 x 240/288 (MPEG-1)

Secondary/Sub Video Plane Resolution

up to 1920 x 1080

up to 1920 x 1080

NA

Secondary/Sub Video Plane Player Min. Requirements

up to 720 x 480

up to 720 x 480

NA

Graphics/Sub Picture Planes Resolution

up to 1920 x 1080

up to 1920 x 1080

up to 720 x 478

Regional Playback Control (RPC)

NA

3 regions (A, B, C)

8 regions (1 to 8)

Multiple Angles

up to 9

up to 9

up to 9

Seamless Branching

yes

yes

yes

Picture-in-Picture (PiP)

yes

BD-Video FSP/BONUSVIEW, BD-Live

NA

Content Protection

AACS, Media Mark

AACS, BD+, ROM Mark

CSS, CPRM, VCPS

Digital Output Content Protection

HDCP, DTCP, WMDRM, AACS (DOT)

HDCP, DTCP, WMDRM, AACS (DOT)

CGMS-D, DTCP

Analog Output Content Protection

ACP, CGMS-A, AACS (ICT, analog sunset)

ACP, CGMS-A, AACS (ICT, analog sunset)

ACP, AGC, CGMS-A

Managed Copy

AACS (TBA)

AACS (TBA)

NA

Audio Watermark

AACS (TBA)

AACS (TBA)

NA

Play Modes

Standard Content (Category 1), Advanced Content (Category 2)

HDMV, BD-J

NA

Feature Profiles

Performance Level 1, 2

BD-Video (Profile 1 GP, 1.1 FSP/BONUSVIEW), BD-Live (Profile 2)

NA

Advanced Interactivity/Features

Advanced Content

BD-J

NA

Local/Persistent Storage Min. Capacity

128 MB

256 MB (BD-Video 1.1 FSP/ BONUSVIEW), 1 GB (BD-Live)

NA

Connection to Additional Local/Persistent Storage

optional: Performance Level 1
yes: Performance Level 2

optional

NA

Internet/Network Connection

yes

BD-Live

NA

* Dolby Lossless = Dolby Digital + Dolby TrueHD.
** A DTS-HD bitstream consists of the DTS Core and optional extensions including DTS-96/24, DTS-ES, DTS-HD High Resolution Audio (DTS-HD HR) and DTS-HD Master Audio (DTS-HD MA).

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